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Rainbows, Brownies, Guides, Senior Section & Trefoil Guild in Sittingbourne

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DIVISION STANDARD

This Division Standard emblem may be purchased at a cost

of £2. We also have a Sittingbourne Tonge Division Standard

emblem (see below) - flag now laid up - also at a cost of £2. 

Please complete the contact us details and one of the team

will contact you.

 

Below is a guide to what the different emblems on the

standard mean.

 

GIRLGUIDING SITTINGBOURNE DIVISION – KENT EAST

SITTINGBOURNE DIVISION STANDARDTHE STANDARD IS MADE UP AS FOLLOWS:

 

THE WORLD GUIDE TREFOIL – This goes on every Standard in the place of honour nearest the hoist.

 

THE COUNTY BADGE – A British King first displayed the white horse on his flag.  Around  499AD  his two brothers Hengist and Horsa, Jutish chieftains, assisted his campaign against the Picts.  They then conquered Kent.

 

Motto: INVICTA – meaning unconquered, dates from the time of William the Conqueror.  After his victory at Hastings he was marching on Dover when met by Stignand heading a group of men called the Invicti.  They agreed not to oppose William if he retained the ancient Laws of Kent.  From that time the distinction arose between “Men of Kent” - those being the Jutish Invicti of the East division and “Kentish Men”  - the dwellers between Rochester and London.

 

Kent was divided into two Girl Guide counties on 1st September 1959, the Eastern half known as Guides of Kent (Kent East), the Western half known as Kentish Guides.

 

There are now four Kent Guide Counties – Guides of Kent – Kent East; Kent West; Kent Weald and Greater London Kent.

 

THE GUIDE MOTTO – BE PREPARED.

 

LI0N RAMPANT GULES – The Red Lion is found in many coats of arms of ancient families in the area.  It reminds one of the hospitality found in local inns by travellers over many generations, for example the Canterbury Pilgrims, King Henry V and those in the great Coaching era.

 

It stands on a scroll of parchment representing one of the major local industries, paper making.

 

THE CHERRY TREE – Cherry growing was revived in England during the reign of King Henry VIII and this district has been at its centre ever since.

 

The Mound is a reminder of the value of land, not only for agriculture but also for minerals.

 

THE WYVERN – RAMPANT COMBATANT VERT

A device associated particularly with Milton Regis.  The combatant posture indicates the defence which the ancient inhabitants made against Danish and later invaders.

 

It stands on a wall of bricks representing another industry of the area.

 

WATER has always played an important part in the life of the area, whether for ancient fisheries, navigation or modern industry.

The design was compiled from entries in a competition submitted by:

 

     Colonel R. Black

     Mrs Naismith

     Mrs Feakes

 

The Design was submitted to the Girl Guide Heraldry Advisor for approval.

 

The making of the Standard was undertaken by Mr and Miss Orchard of Gillingham.

 

The Standard was completed on 1st June 1967 and dedicated on 4th October 1967 in St. Michael’s Church Sittingbourne, by Reverend J.D. Meacham.

 

 

GIRLGUIDING SITTINGBOURNE DIVISION – KENT EAST

SITTINGBOURNE TONGE DIVISION STANDARD

THE STANDARD IS MADE UP AS FOLLOWS:

 

THE WORLD GUIDE TREFOIL – This goes on every Standard in the place of

honour nearest the hoist.

 

THE COUNTY BADGE – a British King first displayed the white horse on his flag.  Around 499 AD his two brothers Hengist and Horsa, Jutish chieftains, assisted his campaign against the Picts, they then conquered Kent.

 

Motto: INVICTA – meaning unconquered dates from the time of William the Conqueror.  After his victory at Hastings he was marching on Dover when met by Stignand heading a group of men called the Invicti.  They agreed not to oppose William if he retained the ancient Laws of Kent.  From that time the distinction arose between “Men of Kent” - those being the Jutish Invicti of the East division and “Kentish Men” – the dwellers between Rochester and London.

 

Kent was divided into two Girl Guide counties on 1st September 1959, the Eastern half known as Guides of Kent (Kent East) and the Western half known as Kentish Guides.

 

There are now four Kent Guide Counties – Guides of Kent – Kent East; Kent West; Kent Weald and Greater London Kent.

 

THE GUIDE MOTTO – BE PREPARED.

 

AN ANIMAL HIDE

There is a suggestion that a Hide, would be cut into a strip or strips and joined then laid on the ground to encompass a piece of Land which would then belong to the local Landowner.  THONG is the word for a strip of leather and this is possibly corrupted to the word TONG or TONGE.

 

TONGE or TONG is also the word used to describe a strip of land so there may be some link here with the strips of hide to encompass the land.

 

A SAILING BARGE – many of which sailed from the local creeks such as Milton creek.

 

THE CHURCH – a representation of the small parish church of St. Giles, Tonge.

 

The Standard Committee comprised Mrs Shirley Willis, Division Commissioner, Mrs Jean Norton, East District Commissioner and Mrs Vera Brammer, North District Commissioner, Mrs Ann McDonald, Guide Guider and Mrs Winnifred Webb, Needlework teacher at Rowena Girl’s School and Badge Tester. The Standard was made by Mrs Winnifred Webb.

 

Dedication of the Standard took place on Sunday 8th May 1983 in St. Michael’s Church Sittingbourne, officiant Reverend Francis Turner, Division Chaplain.

 

In 1977 Sittingbourne Division was split into Sittingbourne PARVA and Sittingbourne TONGE Divisions, the original Sittingbourne Standard was adopted by Sittingbourne Parva Division and a new Standard was commissioned for Sittingbourne Tonge Division in 1982.  

 

In 2003 the decision was taken to merge Parva and Tonge once again and revert to the original name of Sittingbourne Division.  Sittingbourne Tonge Division Standard is now “Laid up” and The original Sittingbourne Division Standard is once again used for the whole of the Sittingbourne area.

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